Kindness

Kindness

In Solomon’s description of the virtuous woman he says, “In her tongue is the law of kindness” (Prov. 31:26). Earlier Solomon had also mentioned kindness as a trait to be desired: “There are many plans in a man’s heart, Nevertheless the Lord’s counsel―that will stand. What is desired in a man is kindness, And a poor man is better than a liar” (Prov. 19:21-22). One of the characteristics of charity is that it “is kind” (I Cor. 13:4).

Meeting a Mate and Marrying

Meeting a Mate and Marrying

It has been, for many years, the thinking of Christian parents that the good influence of Christian schools, along with the fact that Christian young people attend these schools, should help their children in these important decisions.  Indeed, if Christian young people associate together in their young years the probability is that they will marry Christians.  This writer believes that every Christian parent should insist with all his/her might that the young man or woman marry one who is a Christian.  What could be better?  Much could be worse.

Just, Justice, Justly

Just, Justice, Justly

The word just is defined as “based on or behaving according to what is morally right and fair” • (of treatment) deserved or appropriate in the circumstances • (of an opinion or appraisal) well founded; justifiable.” Justice is a noun defined to mean “just behavior or treatment • the quality of being fair and reasonable” (all definitions are from the On-Line Dictionary). Justly is an adverb describing the action of being just or doing justice.

Longsuffering

Longsuffering

Often today, when one surveys our world and sees the exceeding sinfulness, ungodliness, corruption, denial of God and all that is right, we hear statements similar to this: “How can God allow our world to continue when it is as evil and wicked as it is?”

At Year’s End

At Year’s End

Tennessee Bible College would like to wish you and your family a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year!

Today as you prepare to spend time with family and friends and enjoy all this season has to offer, we would like to share with you a devotional article written to encourage reflection and Christian self-examination at the year’s end.

Happy holidays!

Our Responsibility Now

Our Responsibility Now

As the apostle Paul closed the discussion of the great doctrine of the resurrection he was led by the Holy Spirit to write, “Therefore, my beloved brethren, be ye steadfast, unmovable, always abounding in the work of the Lord, forasmuch as ye know that your labor is not in vain in the Lord”(1 Corinthians 15:58).  It would be hard to conceive of a situation in the history of the Lord’s church that was worse, from our viewpoint, than the conditions that prevailed at Corinth when Paul wrote this first letter to those brethren.  But, in spite of his many rebukes of their sins, and his admonitions to repent and do better, he never advocated that they just quit and let some other church do what Jesus wanted done! 

Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving

Tennessee Bible College would like to wish you and your family a Happy Thanksgiving! Today we are sharing a special devotional article reflecting on the words of the apostle Paul about thanksgiving. Paul wrote to the Philippians in Philippians 4:6, “Be careful for nothing; but in everything by prayer and supplication with thanksgiving let your requests be made known unto God.” Paul also wrote, “In every thing give thanks: for this is the will of God in Christ Jesus concerning you” (I Thess. 5:18).

Ask for the Old Paths

Ask for the Old Paths

In Jeremiah Chapter 6, verse 16, the great Prophet, Jeremiah, is inspired by God to pen these words, “Thus saith the LORD, Stand ye in the ways, and see, and ask for the old paths, where is the good way, and walk therein, and ye shall find rest for your souls. But they said, We will not walk therein.” It is interesting that the prophets of old, who we look to for examples, often begin what they say with, “Thus saith the Lord.” This is important. Why is it important? It is important, because God’s Word is what saves.

To the End

To the End

I was looking at a display in a Civil War Museum when I noticed an old letter. A Confederate soldier wrote the letter to his wife in August 1864. He mentioned some interesting things about the war and the times, but what really impressed me was how he closed the letter. I expected to see “Affectionately yours” or “With love” just before his signature. These words are meaningful and they would certainly have been appropriate. But this soldier looked at his marriage in a way that is rare today. He closed the letter with these words: “Your husband until death.” These were not empty words.

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